Saturday, March 7, 2020

In Brazil, Corn and Soybeans are now sub-products of FX



I have been sending out regular updates to subscribers
on the current pricing dynamic in Brazil.

I have been pounding the table about FX for months.

The underlying theme has been when USD:BRL gets above
4:1, Chicago becomes less and less important as a hedging tool
and price discovery mechanism within Brazil.

I sense the North American producer is not grasping this
and its importance. As long as MFP 3.0 comes, one can
continue to ignore this South American phenomenon.

I must admit, I too am surprised that we are trading
above 4.32:1. We hit 4.67 on Friday. 
There is more talk of 4.80-5.0 in the coming months.
What I have experienced in the past is that when these forecasts
come in, either to an extreme high or low, they tend
not to quite make the projection.

With the BRL, there is never anyone that forecasts that the
new trend i.e. 4:1 to 4.67, but when the break out comes,
everyone sees it going to 5:1. This is called bullshit.

In January, when FX was 4:1, the projections by major banks
were for 3.80:1 for the year. When we broke out of the 4.32:1 
Nov 2019 high, then the forecasts flipped to how high we can go. 

To the chagrin of many, the Brazilian economy is quite stable.
Low inflation, low interest rates, and an admin that has and still
wants to cut spending. The Brazilian GDP has been cut from 2.5%
to 1.5% for 2020 because of Corona, but even so, this is quite
stable. It looks like Brazil will cut the Selic rate to 4% soon.

The Brazilian farmer is selling his crop quickly and getting 2021
sold too. Soybean prices in Mato Grosso are trading at the highest
level since July 2016(the drought year). Meanwhile, Chicago soybeans
are trading near contract lows. Corn prices in Mato Grosso feel like
US$ 7.00 per bu in Chicago. 

When we talk about sub-products with soybeans and corn, we
tend to think of ethanol, DDGs, corn syrup, soybean oil and meal.

The value of soybeans and corn in Chicago are derived from what
the sub-products are worth on the global stage.

In Brazil, when FX is at 4.60, we can start to think of corn and soybeans
as sub-products of the USD FX. 
If the Corona virus wanes and economic activity picks up and the Dollar
declines, we can get back to normal.
However, if we do trade up to 5:1 on a USA/Global meltdown, the
Brazilian farmer need not even look at a Chicago quote screen.

It will not matter. FX is the driver- not supply and demand. 

The Brazilian farmer and USA farmer live in two different worlds
at the moment.

The Brazilian farmer sees a bull market and is preparing for 2021
and 2022 accordingly i.e. expansion of production. 

The USA farmer sees a bear market and is preparing accordingly i.e
crop insurance revenue protection, PLC/ARC payments, and potential
for MFP 3.0. In other words, producing for below the cost of production
unless max yield is achieved. This reminds me of the LDP mindset of the
90s. 

Lots of interest in RUMO these days. Railroad expansion and who will
get the Ferrograo concession scheduled for June. 

For those paying attention, now is the time to send money to Brazil.

Drop me a note if any questions.

agturbobrazil@yahoo.com

Happy Easter

Kory

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